Friday, February 23, 2018

Word Play for Writers—Marvelous Malaprops


by Lori Hatcher @LoriHatcher2

“You can lead a horse to manure, but you can’t make him drink.”

“We’ll burn that bridge when we get to it.”

Ahhh, the marvelous malaprop – Grammarist.com defines it as “a verbal mistake in which a word is substituted with another word that sounds similar but means something entirely different, often to comedic effect.”

Thursday, February 22, 2018

An Author's Promise to His Readers


by Henry McLaughlin @RiverBendSagas

As writers, we’re constantly making promises to our readers. Often they start with our title and cover. A cover of a couple looking longingly at each other promises romance. How disconcerting it would be to discover a horror story on the pages. Even though some romances can end up horrible.

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Make Each Blog Post as Good as a Book


by Katy Kauffman @KatyKauffman28

Don’t panic. This may sound daunting—to make each blog post as good as a book. What I mean is, does it have a main idea that gives the whole post value? Does it have an intriguing beginning and a powerful ending? Do the paragraphs stay on track and share just enough detail to make your point? Is the take away presented in such a way that it will affect the mind and heart of the reader? Is it as good as a book?

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

When Writers Need to Rest


by Lucinda Secrest McDowell @LucindaSMcDowel

A whole week in a cottage by the sea. Sounds like a perfect time to write, doesn’t it?
           
Or not.

Monday, February 19, 2018

Be Fluid With Your Social Media Brand


by Molly Jo Realy @RealMoJo68

Who are you, really? Are you just a God-loving, cat-cuddling, coffee drinker? Or is there more to you, more to your writing? Maybe your manuscripts are full of prose you want to share with the world, but you also enjoy baking for your family and neighbors.

My point is, there’s not just one, two, or even three aspects of you. The many people in your world see the many facets of you. Like a diamond, shining in all your hard-pressed glory. The viewing angle determines the color and intensity reflecting what’s inside.

Sunday, February 18, 2018

Saturday, February 17, 2018

When Writing Love Scenes—the Eyes Have It


by Emme Gannon @GannonEmme

Ah, February. Somewhere between January’s frigid days and March’s warming trend, nature stirs from her winter rest, and our hearts turn to love. Store windows lure us in with dangling red hearts. Men of all ages line up at grocery store check-outs waiting to purchase a bouquet of flowers. The pull of love is so irresistible that it has the power to compel a level-headed person to step out of the ordinary into it’s charming embrace.

Just how does a writer describe this phenomenon called love?  I contend, it has to start with the eyes.